Peony is an assembly. The drug is extracted from the root and, less generally, the herb and egg. Peony is sometimes referred to as red peony or white peony. This does not apply to the yellow, red, purple, or white color of the bulbs, but the hue of the root being handled.

Peony is used for gout, arthritis, fever, diseases of the respiratory tract, and cough. People using peony for menstrual cramps, disease of polycystic ovaries, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and menstruation or abortion.

This is also used for viral hepatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, gastrointestinal upset, muscle cramps, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), and diarrhea. Peony is also used for spasms such as cough (pertussis), epilepsy, nerve pain (neuralgia), the headache of migraine, and syndrome of chronic fatigue (CFS).

For healing cracked skin, people apply peony to the skin, especially cracks around the anus (anal fissures) that sometimes occur with hemorrhoids.

Folds of the flesh. Peony contains paeoniflorin, a chemical. Early research shows that adding 0.5 percent paeoniflorin to a particular cosmetic substance for eight weeks may minimize facial wrinkles.

Muscle cramps. Early research suggests that taking a particular combination of peony and licorice (Shakuyaku-kanzoh-to) may ease muscle cramps in people with cirrhosis of the liver and people with hemodialysis.

Arthritis rheumatoid (AR). Early research suggests that taking a peony-containing product along with the 3-month drug methotrexate may reduce swelling test markers in people with RA better than taking methotrexate alone.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding: when taken by mouth during pregnancy, peony is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Some research development suggests that peony may cause uterine contractions. Some study, however, indicates that a mixture of peony and angelica may be healthy. Until more is understood, if you are breastfeeding, do not use the peony. If you’re breastfeeding, also avoid the peony. If you’re pregnant, you don’t care enough about the health of using peony.

Bleeding disorders: Since peony can delay blood clotting, there is fear that in people with bleeding disorders, it may also increase the risk of bleeding. If you have a bleeding disorder, don’t use it.

Peony is POSSIBLY SAFE for short-term use by hand. Peony was used for up to 4 weeks safely. It may cause an upset stomach. When it comes to sensitive people’s skin, it can cause a rash.

Special Precautions & Warnings: Pregnancy and breast-feeding: if taken by mouth during pregnancy, peony is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Some research in the development suggests that peony may cause uterine contractions. Other research, however, suggests that a combination of peony and angelica may be safe. Until more is understood, if you are breastfeeding, do not use peony. If you’re breastfeeding, stop peony as well. If you’re pregnant, you don’t care enough about the health of using peony.

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Talk to your health care provider with this combination.

Peony could slow down the clotting of blood. Take peony along with medications that may also increase the likelihood of swelling and bleeding.

Phenytoin (Dilantin)Interaction Rating: Medium Speak to your health care provider with this mix.

Peony root may minimize the body’s amount of phenytoin. Taking the peony root together with phenytoin (Dilantin) may reduce phenytoin (Dilantin) effectiveness and increase the risk of seizures.

Several sluggish blood clotting drugs include creatine, clopidogrel (Plavix),  ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), warfarin (Coumadin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, and others.

The correct dosage of peony depends on several variables, such as age, fitness, and numerous other circumstances of the patient. There is not enough scientific information available at this time to establish a reasonable spectrum of peony doses. Keep in mind that naturally occurring products are not always safe, and dosages may be important. Be sure to follow relevant product label directions and consult before using it with your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional.

PAENOLIFLORIN

PAENOLIFLORIN

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